How to Protect Your Wireless Refill From Identity Thieves

Wireless refill cards are typically regarded as the safest way to use mobile phones. Unlike contract plans where you are forced to use your credit card and reveal personal information, these cards are typically anonymous. At the same time, skilled or lucky hackers can still mine your information if you are not careful. Here are a few ways to keep yourself safe when buying wireless refill cards.

Cash
Perhaps the best way to protect your identity when buying a wireless refill card is by paying with cash. Unlike credit and debit cards that are tied to your identity, cash is anonymous and won’t reveal a single thing about you. The one problem with this is that it limits you to buying from retail stores. This might make it hard to take advantage of online sales, but it definitely stands as one of the best ways to avoid identity theft.

Encrypted Websites
While using cash is anonymous, you should also be safe if you use a credit card at a reputable website. By law, online stores are supposed to protect your information via encryption. This means that your data is scrambled as it travels through the Internet. Only the store owner’s website has the key to make sense of this encrypted data, which makes it nearly impossible for hackers to steal your information.

Be sure to look for a badge or explanation of the website’s security methods. A good website will make you feel safe by saying that they take identity theft seriously. It might be law for them to use encryption, but unfortunately this is difficult to uphold because there are so many websites. If you don’t see anything about encryption, then don’t trust the website with your credit card.

Phishing Emails
This is rarely used now because wireless refill card aren’t as popular as they used to be, but there are still scams like this looking to steal your information. A phishing email is an online communication with a link that is meant to steal your identity. The email might promise something too good to be true, such as 10,000 minutes for $1 if you just fill out a survey or enter some information. It might be something as small as your name and address, or big like your social security number of credit card information.

If you get an email like this, it’s best to ignore it. Even clicking the link can infect your computer with a virus.

Damaged Cards
This scam is more typically used to steal the number on the refill card so that it can be used when you pay for the card, but it can also be used to steal your identity. The majority of wireless refill cards have a section on the back that must be scratched off to reveal certain numbers. These numbers are used to activate the minutes. Some people will scratch this off, write down the numbers and then keep the card on the shelf and wait for someone to buy it. Just make sure that the card is in perfect condition before buying

Wireless refill cards are typically very safe and you shouldn’t have to worry about your identity being stolen. At the same time, these steps are good for any purchase because they will keep you from accidentally revealing information to the wrong people. Just keep this in mind and you should have no problem staying safe.

 

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